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The Orwell Prizes for Books, Journalism and Exposing Britain's Social Evils: Announcing the 2017 Orwell Prize Longlists

Longlists for the Orwell Prize for Books, Journalism and Britain’s Social Evils were announced today, following a year in which George Orwell’s name has returned to the heart of political discourse. 14 books were longlisted for the Orwell Prize for Books and 14 journalists were longlisted for the Orwell Prize for Journalism. 12 entries were longlisted for the Orwell Prize for Britain’s Social Evils.

 

The Orwell Prize for Books  2017 longlist:

  • The Power by Naomi Alderman (Viking)
  • Citizen Clem by John Bew (Quercus)
  • The Seven by Ruth Dudley Edwards (Oneworld)
  • The Return by Hisham Matar (Viking)
  • Black and British by David Olusoga (Macmillan)
  • The Life Project by Helen Pearson (Allen Lane)
  • Easternisation by Gideon Rachman (The Bodley Head)
  • All Out War by Tim Shipman (William Collins)
  • The Marches by Rory Stewart (Vintage, Jonathan Cape)
  • Island Story by J. D. Taylor (Repeater)
  • And the Sun Shines Now by Adrian Tempany (Faber & Faber)
  • Enough Said by Mark Thompson (The Bodley Head)
  • Cut by Hibo Wardere, in collaboration with Anna Wharton (Simon & Schuster)
  • Another Day in the Death of America by Gary Younge (Guardian Faber)

The judges for the Orwell Prize for Books 2017 are Jonathan Derbyshire, Bonnie Greer, Mark Lawson and Erica Wagner

The Orwell Prize for Journalism 2017 longlist:

  • Ian Birrell (Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, The i Paper/The Independent, The Guardian)
  • Rosie Blau (The Economist)
  • Edward Carr (The Economist)
  • Carole Cadwalladr (The Observer)
  • Aditya Chakrabortty (The Guardian)
  • Nick Cohen (Standpoint, The Observer)
  • John Harris (The Guardian)
  • David Hayes (Inside Story)
  • Patrick Kingsley (The Guardian, The Observer)
  • Anthony Loyd (The Times, The New Statesman)
  • Douglas Murray (The Spectator, The Sunday Times)
  • Sarah O’Connor (Financial Times)
  • Fintan O’Toole (The Irish Times, The Guardian, The Observer)
  • Paul Wood (The Spectator, Harper’s)

The judges for the Orwell Prize for Journalism 2017 are Liz Forgan, Allan Little and Francis Wheen

The Orwell Prize for Britain’s Social Evils:

Supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation

  • A Journey on the 25 by Peter Yeung
  • Behind Closed Doors by Anna Hall, Erica Gornall & Louise Tickle (True Vision Aire and the Guardian)
  • The business of single mothers on benefits by Rossalyn Warren (BuzzFeed News/Freelance)
  • Drug company profiteering exposed by Billy Kenber (The Times)
  • Football sexual-abuse scandal by Daniel Taylor (The Guardian/The Observer)
  • From Brighton to the Battlefield; how four friends were drawn to Syria by Mark Townsend (The Guardian)
  • The gangsters on England’s doorstep by Felicity Lawrence (The Guardian)
  • The Nazi Foodbank by Stephen Stewart (The Daily Record)
  • The RBS Dash for Cash by BuzzFeed UK Investigations team; Tom Warren, Jane Bradley & Richard Holmes (Heidi Blake – Editor)
  • Real Britain column by Ros Wynne-Jones (The Daily Mirror)
  • The UK Housing Crisis by Dawn Foster (The Guardian)
  • Zero-hours Britain: Undercover at JD Sports by Channel 4 Investigation Unit; Ciaran Jenkins, Andy Lee & Lee Sorrell (Job Rabkin – Editor)

The judges for the Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils 2017 are Samira Ahmed, Claire Ainsley and Julian Le Grand

 

The Orwell Prize announces 2017 events programme

Today The Orwell Prize released an expanded events programme for 2017 in celebration of its move to UCL, announcing a series of lectures alongside its usual Prize events.

The Orwell Prize Lectures 2017

  • The Orwell Lecture 2017: A. L. Kennedy, writer
  • Ruth Davidson, Leader of the Scottish Conservative Party
  • Josie Rourke, Artistic Director at the Donmar Warehouse

The Orwell Prize also announces a live public reading of Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, to be held in conjunction with UCL during the UCL Festival of Culture 2017, on 6th June 2017.

All events are free and open to the public.

Alongside it’s usual events programme – including the Orwell Prize Shortlist Debate and the Orwell Prize Ceremony – the Orwell Prize is delighted to announce additional events for 2017. The Orwell Prize is the UK’s most prestigious prize for political writing, and also a registered charity dedicated to the promotion of public understanding of and interest in politics. All events run by the Prize are free and open to the public. The Orwell Prize is based at UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies, and is sponsored by the Political Quarterly, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and Richard Blair.

Jean Seaton, Director of the Orwell Prize, said:

“Next year we have an exciting menu: politics three ways. For the first time we are running three major lectures, each of which takes an Orwell theme and relates it to writing, politics and culture. And in June: come and be part of 1984 Live. Feel the resonances. In the original Ministry of Information, with Orwell’s own son, the political, literary, intellectual inheritors of the day and you, the people, reading 1984 all of a long summers’ day in London”.

Rt. Hon. Ruth Davidson MSP

Ruth Davidson is the leader of the Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party. Formerly a journalist and signaller in the Territorial Army, she was elected to the Scottish Parliament in 2011. Ruth Davidson will give a one-off lecture in 2017.

Josie Rourke

Josie Rourke is the Artistic Director of the Donmar Warehouse theatre. Josie is currently directing Les Liaisons Dangereuses starring Liev Schreiber and Janet McTeer at The Booth Theatre, New York following the sold out run of her production of PRIVACY, starring Daniel Radcliffe at The Public Theater, New York. She also directed The Vote which was live broadcast on More4 on Election Night 2015.

The Orwell Lecture 2017: A. L. Kennedy

A. L. Kennedy has twice been selected as one of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists and has won a host of other awards – including the Costa Book of the Year for her novel Day. She lives in London and is a part-time lecturer in creative writing at Warwick University.

The Orwell Lecture was founded by Professor Sir Bernard Crick and has been given annually since 1989. Originally held at Birckbeck, University of London and the University of Sheffield, the Lecture is now held at University College London, where the Orwell Prize is based, each autumn.

Ian Hislop will give the Orwell Lecture 2016. Recent Orwell Lecturers include Dr Rowan Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury (2015), Professor Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at the University of Oxford (2013) and Dame Hilary Mantel, two-time winner of the Man Booker Prize (2009).

1984 Live – 6th June 2016

In 2016, UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies became home to the Orwell Prize, bringing the Orwell Prize and the Orwell Archive, which was given to UCL on permanent loan by Orwell’s wife, together

at UCL. In celebration of this partnership, and of one of the world’s most incisive and relevant writers, UCL and The Orwell Prize are delighted to present this unique event as part of the UCL Festival of Culture 2017: A live, start-to-finish reading of Nineteen Eighty-Four in Senate House, University of London.

For the first time in the UK, hear Nineteen Eighty-Four read by a host of actors, writers, journalists and members of the public over the course of a single day in the centre of London. This unique event, part of the UCL Festival of Culture 2017, will be free and open to the public.

George Orwell’s dystopian masterpiece Nineteen Eighty-Four was written in 1948, just before he died of tuberculosis in University College Hospital.  Senate House – where Orwell’s wife worked during the war – provided inspiration for the Ministry of Truth, which Orwell so chillingly depicted in the novel. Nineteen Eighty-Four has become perhaps the most pervasively influential book of the twentieth century. This unique event will offer the opportunity to hear Orwell’s seminal work read aloud in the building which inspired the literary world’s most fearsome building.

For further information or to get involved, go to https://www.orwellfoundation.com/1984live

For further information, please contact stephanie.lelievre@orwellfoundation.com  or on 020 3108 1618

ENDS

  1. The Orwell Prize is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing and a registered charity (number 1161563), providing free cultural events and resources for the public benefit.
  2. The Prize was founded by the late Professor Sir Bernard Crick in its present form in 1993, awarding its first prizes in 1994. The Prize is supported by Political Quarterly, Richard Blair (Orwell’s son), A. M. Heath, and Joseph Rowntree Foundation.
  3. The Orwell Prize is based at UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies. For more information about the Institute of Advanced Studies, please see https://www.ucl.ac.uk/institute-of-advanced-studies
  4. For further information, please contact lelievre@orwellfoundation.com or on020 3108 1618
  1. Find out more at orwellfoundation.com

The Orwell Prize 2017 is now open for entries

The Orwell Prize is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing, awarded to the book and journalism which comes closest to George Orwell’s ambition ‘to make political writing into an art’.

Entry is free, and there is no limit to the number of entries a publisher or publication can make. All entries must have a link to the UK or Ireland (see our rules for more details). The Prize is open to fiction, non-fiction and journalism first published in the calendar year 2016. For the full rules, please see here.

There are three categories:

The Orwell Prize for Books

The Orwell Prize for Journalism

The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils, supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation

The Orwell Prize for books will be judged by Jonathan Derbyshire, Bonnie Greer, Mark Lawson and Erica Wagner; the Orwell Prize for Journalism 2017 will be judged by Liz Forgan, Alan Little and Francis Wheen; the Orwell for Exposing Britain’s Social evils, sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, will be judged by Samira Ahmed, Claire Ainsley and Julian Le Grand.

The Orwell Prize 2017 opens for entries today, 31st October 2016 and closes on the 12th January 2017. Enter the prize  or email the administrator jeremy.wikeley@theorwellprize.co.uk.

Scholars should be free to pass without hindrance

Ken Macdonald QC, Chair of the Orwell Prize

Wednesday 19th October 2016

At the launch of the Orwell Prize 2017 , Lord Ken Macdonald QC, Chair of the Orwell Prize, made the following address:


“Before we embark on the evening’s proceedings, I’m delighted to announce that the Orwell Prize has a new home- in the Institute of Advanced Studies at UCL. And I’d like to thank Professor Jo Woolf, previously Dean of Arts at UCL, and now of the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford, for his role in securing this important and hugely appropriate association.

This move is particularly pleasing to us, not just because UCL already contains the Orwell Archive, but also because it is the university of Bentham and a great international, a great transnational institution. London’s Global University, as it nattily styles itself.

When Europe’s first university was established, in Bologna, in 1088, 200 hundred years before the University of Oxford, its origins were these: groups of young foreigners who came together in mutual aid societies for protection against city laws which imposed collective punishment upon them, as foreigners, for the crimes and debts of their fellow countrymen.

Having joined together in this way, these young men hired scholars from the city to teach them- and in time they decided to form a larger association, or ‘universitas’. A University.

It is perhaps because it was born in this way that the University of Bologna’s founding charter proclaimed the revolutionary principle that scholars should be free to pass without hindrance, they should not be oppressed by borders.

Of course this notion was both real and a metaphor, for if scholars were to be allowed to pass freely across Europe, then so too would ideas in their wake.

This idea, conceived in eleventh century Italy, now seems obvious to us. Today, it’s really quite impossible to conceive of a national university, except in vaguely sinister terms, just as it’s impossible to contemplate a national science without hearing ugly echoes from history.

So although my university, the University of Oxford, is situated physically in the heart of England, it is a European university. It is a world university.

In my College alone, 20 per cent of the undergraduates come from overseas, many, of course, from the European mainland. Around 65 per cent of our graduate students are also from abroad, and our fellowship is heavily international.ken-macdonald-3

This is the difference between Lysenko and Wittgenstein. And in the difference lies our protection against the evil, the anti-university evil, identified by Orwell himself when he wrote that if thought isn’t free, if the intellect is bound and national, if it is constrained and bordered, we live with the danger that any inquiry that is followed may lead to a forbidden thought.

It is quite mad to see incoming students from abroad as a symptom of a loss of control, or to believe that any control that’s lost by their arrival is worth mourning. To believe that foreign scholars amount to a problem, we’d have to imagine that the intellect they bring with them is somehow immigrant intellect, and less welcome for that reason. And that bad dream is accompanied by its own especially ugly historical resonance.”

 

The Orwell Prize Moves to UCL

Film by Rob Eagle, UCL Communications

The Orwell Prize has announced that it will now be based at The Institute of Advanced Studies at UCL, home to the Orwell Archive.

The announcement, which marks the start of an exciting new era for the Orwell Prize, were made at a debate to celebrate the launch of the Orwell Prize 2017 on ‘Experts, the Media and Politics’ featuring Jamie Bartlett, Ashwin Kumar, Christopher Snowdon and Polly Toynbee.

The Orwell Prize also announced that Ian Hislop will give the Orwell Lecture 2016 on Tuesday 15th November 2016 and The Judges for the Orwell Prize 2017.

Jean Seaton, Director of the Orwell Prize, said

“Arriving at UCL – home of the Orwell Archive – is an exciting moment in the development of the Orwell Prize. Orwell’s focus on the slipperiness of political language is particularly compelling in our own uncertain times, and this year’s Orwell judges will be unearthing a selection of the best, bleakest, most inspiring, most intelligent thinking in writing and journalism. The Prize depends on both the authority and variety of tastes that the judges bring to the process and this year we have a stellar collection. But the first thing we have to offer is one of the great public moralists of the moment, Ian Hislop, giving the Orwell Lecture 2017”.

Professor Tamar Garb, Director of UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies, said

“The Orwell Prize’s move to UCL is as logical as it is exciting. UCL has been home to the Archive since 1960 – it was deposited at UCL on permanent loan by his widow, ten years after Orwell’s death from tuberculosis at University College Hospital –  and has hosted the Orwell Lecture since 2013. Now, the Orwell Prize will be based at UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies. The Orwell Prize is a natural fit within our commitment to critical thinking across conventional disciplinary boundaries. We look forward to working with The Orwell Prize to develop Orwell scholarship, and to stimulate cultural and political discourse in the name of one of the world’s most incisive and relevant writers.”

The Orwell Prize is now based at the Institute of Advanced Studies, UCL. UCL is home to the Orwell Archive, the most comprehensive body of research material relating to George Orwell anywhere. The Orwell Prize expects to be able to develop Orwell scholarship and cultural and political engagement in the sympathetic and stimulating environment of the IAS, which is committed to critical thinking across conventional boundaries.

Ian Hislop to give The Orwell Lecture 2016

 

The Orwell Prize has today announced that Ian Hislop will give the Orwell Lecture 2016, at University College London on Tuesday 15th November 2016. The Lecture will be titled ‘The Right to Dissent (and the Left too)’

To book tickets, please see the event page.

THE ORWELL LECTURE

The Orwell Lecture was founded by Professor Sir Bernard Crick and has been given annually since 1989. Originally held at Birckbeck, University of London and the University of Sheffield, the Lecture is now held at University College London, where the Orwell Prize is based, each autumn.

Recent Orwell Lecturers include Dr Rowan Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury (2015), Professor Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at the University of Oxford (2013) and Dame Hilary Mantel, two-time winner of the Man Booker Prize for Fiction (2009).

The Orwell Lecture is open to the public and tickets are free.

IAN HISLOP

Ian Hislop is a writer, editor and broadcaster. He has been editor of Private Eye since 1986. He is probably best known for his role as a regular team captain on the BBC show Have I Got News for You.

He joined Private Eye in 1981, and became editor in 1986. He has appeared on BBC Question Time, written and presented documentaries for television and radio about various subjects including the History of Tax, female hymn writers, Dr Beeching, Victorian Philanthropists, the First World War, and The Stiff Upper Lip. In 2016 he presented a documentary on Victorian Benefits: Workers or Shirkers. He co-wrote a dramatisation of The Wipers Times with Nick Newman, which was nominated for a BAFTA for Best Single Drama of 2014, and won the Best Single Drama Award in Broadcasting Press Guild Awards, 2014. In 2016, he and Nick Newman wrote the critically acclaimed 2016 Radio 4 comedy drama Trial By Laughter.

Ian has received numerous awards, including a BAFTA Award in 1991 and a British Academy Lifetime Achievement Award at the British Comedy Awards 2011 for Have I Got News for You,  Editors’ Editor, British Society of Magazine Editors in 1991; Magazine of the Year, What the Papers Say in 1991; Editor of the Year, British Society of Magazine Editors, in 1998; Channel 4 Political Awards, for Political Satire in 2004; and a Channel 4 Political Award, for Political Comedy in 2006, A Voice of the Listener and Viewer Award for Excellence in Broadcasting 2009, Political Studies Association. Diamond Jubilee Award. Best Political Satire, 2010, a Liberty Human Rights Award for Private Eye in 2011 and Trip Advisors Travellers’ Choice in 2012. Have I Got News For You won a BAFTA in 2016 for Best Comedy Programme.

The Orwell Prize announces Judges for 2017

The Orwell Prize has announced its judges for 2017, and that it will now be based at The Institute of Advanced Studies at UCL, home to the Orwell Archive.

The Orwell Prize for Books 2017 will be judged by Jonathan Derbyshire, Bonnie Greer, Mark Lawson and Erica Wagner.

The Orwell Prize for Journalism 2017 will be Judged by Liz Forgan, Alan Little and Francis Wheen.

The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils 2017, which is sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, will be judged by Samira Ahmed, Claire Ainsley and Julian Le Grand.

Read more about the judges here

The announcements, which mark the start of an exciting new era for the Orwell Prize, were made at a debate to celebrate the launch of the Orwell Prize 2017 on ‘Experts, the Media and Politics’ featuring Jamie Bartlett, Ashwin Kumar, Christopher Snowdon and Polly Toynbee.

The Orwell Prize also announced that Ian Hislop will give the Orwell Lecture 2016 on Tuesday 15th November 2016.

Jean Seaton, Director of the Orwell Prize, said

“Arriving at UCL – home of the Orwell Archive – is an exciting moment in the development of the Orwell Prize. Orwell’s focus on the slipperiness of political language is particularly compelling in our own uncertain times, and this year’s Orwell judges will be unearthing a selection of the best, bleakest, most inspiring, most intelligent thinking in writing and journalism. The Prize depends on both the authority and variety of tastes that the judges bring to the process and this year we have a stellar collection. But the first thing we have to offer is one of the great public moralists of the moment, Ian Hislop, giving the Orwell Lecture 2017”.

Following the launch, the Orwell Prize 2017 will open for entries on Monday 31st October and will close on Thursday 12th January.

Encountering Orwell

To celebrate the launch of our new website, The Orwell Prize is publishing a new set of Encounters in our Encountering Orwell Series. In 2014, to Celebrate our 21st Birthday, we collected and published a series of Encounters with Orwell: winners, judges, board members and friends were asked to share their experiences of reading George Orwell. Over the coming days, we will publish a series of new Encounters on our website, beginning with Dr Rowan Williams’ which you can read today. Follow us on twitter to keep up to date.

You can read the first collection of Encountering Orwell here.

Jean Seaton, Director of the Orwell Prize, said:

Books are mind-altering things. They speak into the intimate inner-ear of the reader, subtly altering how the world is understood from the inside out. Reading builds and re-directs a person. Books can enlarge (but also constrain) how people see things, places and events. Some reading does more than that – it changes mentalities – sets a whole stance on the world. But any particular reading is also an odd synthesis of personal history and historical moment. Good books need their readers primed to read them as well.

So the Orwell Prize is excited and honoured to publish a new collection in its series of Orwell Encounters featuring great writers and doers – people who have shaped our collective thinking – such as Rowan Williams, Melvyn Bragg, Clive Stafford Smith who founded Reprieve, Shami Chakrabarti and journalists and critics like Robert Colls and Alison Holt. All of them evidently enjoyed pinning down that first significant meeting with Orwell the writer. When original, thoughtful people meet a thought-provoking original, the encounters lead in many unexpected directions. Encounter them encountering Orwell

Next generation of political writers attend inspirational Orwell Youth Prize Celebration Day

The Orwell Youth Prize Celebrated a successful year of workshops and over 100 prize entrants at a day-long event on Friday 24th June. Prizes were awarded to young writers who had submitted entries inspired by Orwell’s words: “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear”.

  • Over 150 guests attended the Orwell Youth Prize Celebration Day 2016 at Pembroke College, Oxford
  • Day celebrates a year of workshops in schools, and the achievements of over 100 entrants aged 14 – 18
  • Some of the country’s best journalists and writers were present to give workshops and seminars to the students in attendance.
  • TV presenter Rick Edwards chaired debate on young people and voting in the wake of the EU referendum
  • Six winners announced

841A2094

Over 150 young people and their guests and teachers travelled from schools across the country to Pembroke College at the University of Oxford for the day, at which TV presenter Rick Edwards chaired a debate on young people and voting, and journalists and writers Delia Jarrett-Macaulay, Iona Craig, Tom Sperlinger and Louise Tickle led seminars on writing and the experiences and processes behind their work.

 

Over 100 young people entered pieces into the writing prize, and those who requested it were provided with bespoke feedback on their drafts. Alongside the winners, 13 runners up received prizes, and 14 young people were highly commended.

The entries ranged from spoken word poetry about race and racism and an essay about the education system in the lower age category to essays about ‘No Platforming’ and disability benefit in the older age category.

841A2344The winners were chosen by judge Amelia Gentleman, social affairs writer for the Guardian and winner of the Orwell Prize for political writing, and Professor Jean Seaton, chair of the Orwell Prize and Official BBC Historian. Amelia Gentleman said “There was a wide and wonderfully imaginative interpretation of the brief by entrants. It was exciting to read the entries. The energy and ambition of those who took part was striking. Some of the winning entries were provocative, others were startlingly original; all were fascinating to read”

841A2023Mick Callanan, Delivery Director, said The talk in workshops all around the country, with students as young as Year 9 and as ready-to-leave as Year 13, has been a model, in its combination of careful listening, logical reasoning and deeply held beliefs…One of the great pleasures of running the workshops was hearing the initial ideas of young people – and then seeing them re-work and redraft to get it ‘just right’.  Our entrants have striven to think deeply about the theme, deeply about their world and deeply about themselves.  Orwell would, I dare guess, be proud of the intellectual and thoughtful England to which they aspire”

 

 

 

Ends:

  1. The Orwell Youth Prize is a registered charity (no. 1156494) under the auspices of the Orwell Prize. The Orwell Prize (registered charity no. 1161563) is the UK’s most prestigious prize for political writing.
  2. The Orwell Youth Prize aims to support and inspire a new generation of politically engaged young writers through workshops, debates, online resources and the awarding of prizes.
  3. 114 young people entered the Orwell Youth Prize in 2016.
  4. In 2015 – 2016, The Orwell Youth Prize delivered 24 workshops in schools across the country.
  5. Writers and journalists who have given workshops this year include Alison Holt (BBC), Mark Townsend (The Guardian), Rebecca Omonira (OpenDemocracy.net) and James Ball (Buzzfeed).

Gideon Rachman and Iona Craig win The Orwell Prize for Journalism 2016

The winners of the Orwell Prize 2016 were announced today, Thursday 26th May 2016.

  • Two journalists share the award for Journalism: Financial Times’ Chief Foreign Affairs Columnist Gideon Rachman and freelance journalist Iona Craig.
  • Judges decide to jointly award the prize for “two distinct schools of journalism”:
  • Craig, a former jockey, wins for frontline reporting on the conflict in Yemen.
  • Rachman’s prize-winning portfolio contains “Olympian” commentary on and analysis of international politics

The Orwell Prize rewards the writing that comes closest to achieving Orwell’s ambition to ‘make political writing an art’. The winners will share the £3000 prize, which was presented today at a ceremony in Fyvie Hall at the University of Westminster.

Richard Blair, George Orwell’s son, presented each winner with a trophy exclusively designed and made by three second-year design students at Goldsmiths University: Tom Morgan, Archie Harding and Panaigiotis Tzortzopolous.

The judges for the Orwell Prize for Journalism 2016 were Frances Cairncross, John Lloyd and Richard Tait.

Frances Cairncross, one of the judges, comments: “The winners demonstrate the very best of two distinct schools of journalism. Gideon Rachman, on the staff of the Financial Times, reflects with Olympian perception on the larger currents of the news, moving thoughtfully between continents and countries. Iona Craig is a freelance journalist, writing with immense courage about one of the least reported and most dangerous conflicts of our age. She has been one of the very few journalists to brave the conflict in Yemen and draw its horrors to global attention”

John Lloyd, a fellow judge, said The Orwell Prize attracts much of the best political writing in the UK – of every kind. Iona Craig’s journalism is close textured, compassionate and campaigning, exposing the real consequences of the shrinking of socially funded justice. Gideon Rachman provides dispassionate and acutely observed views of the world’s large events, providing the reader with some orientation in a world undergoing rapid transformations”.

Rose Sinclair, Lecturer in the Department of Design at Goldsmiths, University of London, said: “It has become tradition for students from our department to design and make the Orwell Prize trophy. Tom, Archie and Panaigiotis have worked together to create something that resonates with the rhetoric of the George Orwell prize: creative, stylish, symbolic, a piece of art in its own right.”

 gideon_rachman

iona_craigFor further information, images and interviews please contact Stephanie Le Lievre at the Orwell Prize

Tel: 0207 848 7930

Email: stephanie.lelievre@orwellfoundation.com

 

Ends

Notes to editors:

  1. The Orwell Prize is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing. Every year, prizes are awarded to the book and journalism entries which come closest to George Orwell’s ambition to ‘make political writing into an art’.
  2. For more information, please see our website www.orwellfoundation.com
  3. The Orwell Prize 2016 is for books and journalism first published in the calendar year 2015. All entries must have a clear link to the UK and Ireland, such as residency or citizenship of the author, or first publication. The Prizes are self-nominating. Someone involved in the creation of the work should be responsible for entering it – this may be, for example, the author, editor, or publisher.
  4. The Orwell Prize for Journalism received 109 entries in 2016.
  5. The Prize was founded by the late Professor Sir Bernard Crick 1993, awarding its first prizes in 1994.
  6. The Orwell Prize is sponsored and supported by Political Quarterly, AM Heath and Richard Blair.
  7. The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils is sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, an independent organisation working to inspire social change through research, policy and practice. For more information, please see https://www.jrf.org.uk/
  8. The Director of the Orwell Prize is Professor Jean Seaton
  9. The Orwell Prize is a registered charity (no. 1161563).

Nicci Gerrard wins The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils 2016

The winner of the Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils 2016 was announced today, Thursday 26th May 2016.

  • Nicci Gerrard wins the Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils for her reporting on the care and understanding of dementia patients in the UK in The Observer and on social media.
  • The Prize, for social issues reporting across two or more platforms, is sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.
  • Gerrard’s reporting and the associated ‘John’s Campaign’ for the right to stay with people with dementia in hospital have raised the issues onto the policy agenda.
  • Her writing and the campaign were motivated by the decline in hospital of Gerrard’s father, Dr John Gerrard, who suffered from Alzheimer’s.

Nicci Gerrard received the £3000 prize at a ceremony in Fyvie Hall at the University of Westminster.

Richard Blair, George Orwell’s son, presented each winner with a trophy exclusively designed and made by three design students at Goldsmiths University: Tom Morgan, Archie Harding and Panaigiotis Tzortzopolous.

Julia Unwin, CEO of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and one of the judges, said “Nicci Gerrard raises fundamental questions about how we, as a society, treat people with dementia.  A lack of humanity, dignity and respect in the delivery of public services is a modern day social evil that can have devastating consequences for individuals and leave families confused, isolated and frightened for the safety of their loved ones. Nicci’s own personal experience adds an authenticity and sense of urgency to her journalism, at the same time, she eloquently reminds us of the role of culture and the importance of authentic representation to challenge stereotypes and open up debate about difficult and complex issues.  Her work is both bold and practical and a shining example of the role of journalism in exposing today’s social evils.”

The judges for the Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils 2016 were Julia Unwin, Nicholas Timmins and Emily Ashton.

Nicci Gerrard is novelist and the author of Soham: A Story Of Our Times. She also writes with her partner Sean French as Nicci French.

Nicci Gerrard’s winning portfolio ‘Word Fail Us: Dementia and the Arts’ can be found on our website.

Rose Sinclair, Lecturer in the Department of Design at Goldsmiths, University of London, said: “It has become tradition for students from our department to design and make the Orwell Prize trophy. Tom, Archie and Panaigiotis have worked together to create something that resonates with the rhetoric of the George Orwell prize: creative, stylish, symbolic, a piece of art in its own right.”

For further information, images and interviews, please contact Stephanie Le Lievre at the Orwell Prize

Tel: 0207 848 7930 

Email: stephanie.lelievre@orwellfoundation.com

 

Ends

Notes to editors:

  1. The Orwell Prize is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing. Every year, prizes are awarded to the book and journalism entries which come closest to George Orwell’s ambition to ‘make political writing into an art’.
  2. For more information, please see our website www.orwellfoundation.com
  3. The Orwell Prize 2016 is for books and journalism first published in the calendar year 2015. All entries must have a clear link to the UK and Ireland, such as residency or citizenship of the author, or first publication. The Prizes are self-nominating. Someone involved in the creation of the work should be responsible for entering it – this may be, for example, the author, editor, or publisher.
  4. The Prize was founded by the late Professor Sir Bernard Crick 1993, awarding its first prizes in 1994.
  5. The Orwell Prize is sponsored and supported by Political Quarterly, AM Heath and Richard Blair.
  6. The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils is sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, an independent organisation working to inspire social change through research, policy and practice. For more information, please see https://www.jrf.org.uk/
  7. The Director of the Orwell Prize is Professor Jean Seaton
  8. The Orwell Prize is a registered charity (no. 1161563).

 

Arkady Ostrovsky’s The Invention of Russia wins The Orwell Prize for Books 2016

The winner of the Orwell Prize for Books 2016 was announced today, Thursday 26th May 2016.

  • Arkady Ostrovsky’s The Invention of Russia (Atlantic Books) wins the Orwell Prize for Books
  • Ostrovsky is a Russian-born British journalist who has spent fifteen years reporting from Russia as a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times and The Economist.
  • The Invention of Russia is an account of Russia’s post-Soviet transformation from Gorbachev’s freedom to Putin’s war and the central role played by the media in creating Russia’s national narrative.
  • Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four was one of the top ten bestselling books in Russia in 2015

The Invention of Russia is published by Atlantic Books. The Orwell Prize rewards the writing that comes closest to achieving Orwell’s ambition to ‘make political writing an art’.

Arkady Ostrovsky received the £3000 prize at a ceremony in Fyvie Hall at the University of Westminster. The Orwell Prize for Journalism and The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils were also awarded at the event

The Invention of Russia is an account of Russia’s post-Soviet transformation from 1985 to the present day, and the central role played by the media – especially television – in creating Russia’s national narrative. Through original research and interviews, Ostrovsky described “the ideological conflicts, compromises and temptations that have left Russia on a knife edge”.

Russian-born Ostrovsky has spent fifteen years reporting from Moscow and holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Cambridge. His translation of Tom Stoppard’s The Coast of Utopia has been published and staged in Russia.

Lord William Waldegrave, chair of the Judges for this year’s Book Prize, said “In a very strong field, Arkady Ostrovsky’s deeply felt and wonderfully knowledgeable account of the genesis of Putin’s Russia stood out as an important and timely book. It is a very worthy winner of the Orwell Prize, dealing as it does with the themes of media manipulation and the control of language, which were very close to George Orwell’s own heart.”

Richard Blair, George Orwell’s son, presented Ostrovsky with a trophy exclusively designed and made by three design students at Goldsmiths University, Tom Morgan, Archie Harding and Panaigiotis Tzortzopolous. The judges for the Orwell Prize for Books 2016 were Lord William Waldegrave, Professor Andrew Gamble, David Goodhart and Fiammetta Rocco.

Rose Sinclair, Lecturer in the Department of Design at Goldsmiths, University of London, said: “It has become tradition for students from our department to design and make the Orwell Prize trophy. Tom, Archie and Panaigiotis have worked together to create something that resonates with the rhetoric of the George Orwell prize: creative, stylish, symbolic, a piece of art in its own right.”

For further information, images and interviews, please contact Stephanie Le Lievre at the Orwell Prize

stephanie.lelievre@orwellfoundation.com        0207 848 7930 

THE INVENTION OF RUSSIA

By Arkady Ostrovsky

Published by Atlantic Books

Publicity Contact: Karen Duffy

KarenDuffy@atlantic-books.co.uk        0207 269 0246

In 1985 Mikhail Gorbachev launched Perestroika, opened Russia up to the world, ended the Cold War and gave his people freedom. The demise of the Soviet Union offered hope that Russia would become a ‘normal’, ‘civilized’ country, embracing Western values of democracy and the free market. Thirty years later, Russia emerged as a corporate state, overcome by imperial nationalism, fanned by its authoritarian president Vladimir Putin, who smashed the post-Cold War order and ignited a war on the borders of Europe.

How did a country that liberated itself from seventy years of Soviet rule end up as one of the biggest threats to the West and, above all, to its own future? Why did the people who rejected Communist ideology come to accept state propaganda? In this bold and important book, Arkady Ostrovsky takes the reader on an enthralling journey from Gorbachev’s freedom to Putin’s war, illuminating the key turning points that often took the world by surprise. The main characters are not politicians, however, but those who took charge of the media and the message and invented Russia’s dominant narrative.

From the suddenly wealthy men who came to command the airwaves to the newspaper editors and TV directors, and from the Russian intelligentsia to the Kremlin spin doctors and ideologists, The Invention of Russia shows just how these figures shaped the country during the tumultuous post-Soviet transformation.

As a foreign correspondent in his own country, Ostrovsky has experienced Russia’s modern history first-hand, and through original research and interviews he reveals the ideological conflicts, compromises and temptations that have left Russia on a knife-edge

 

Ends

Notes to editors:

  1. The Orwell Prize is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing. Every year, prizes are awarded to the book and journalism entries which come closest to George Orwell’s ambition to ‘make political writing into an art’.
  2. For more information, please see our website www.orwellfoundation.com
  3. The Orwell Prize 2016 is for books and journalism first published in the calendar year 2015. All entries must have a clear link to the UK and Ireland, such as residency or citizenship of the author, or first publication. Someone involved in the creation of the work should be responsible for entering it – this may be, for example, the author, editor, or publisher.
  4. The Orwell Prize received 209 entries for the 2016 book prize. In 2015, the Prize received 230 entries.
  5. Previous winners of the Orwell Prize for Books include James Meek (2015), Alan Johnson (2014) and Raja Shehadeh (2008).
  6. The Prize was founded by the late Professor Sir Bernard Crick 1993, awarding its first prizes in 1994.
  7. The Orwell Prize is sponsored and supported by Political Quarterly, AM Heath and Richard Blair.
  8. The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils is sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, an independent organisation working to inspire social change through research, policy and practice. For more information, please see https://www.jrf.org.uk/
  9. The Director of the Orwell Prize is Professor Jean Seaton
  10. The Orwell Prize is a registered charity (no. 1161563).

WIN 1 OF 3 PAIRS OF TICKETS TO SEE THEATRICAL PHENOMENON 1984 AT THE PLAYHOUSE THEATRE

Following a sell-out international tour, the five-star smash hit production of Orwell’s masterpiece 1984 is back in London from 14 June. We’re now offering followers of The Orwell Prize the chance to win 1 of 3 pairs of tickets to see this acclaimed adaptation of the definitive dystopian novel. April, 1984. 13:00. Comrade 6079, Winston Smith, thinks a thought, starts a diary, and falls in love. But Big Brother is always watching. Orwell’s ideas have become our ideas; his fiction is often said to be our reality. The “definitive book of the 20th century” (The Guardian) is re-examined in Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan’s radical and much lauded staging exploring surveillance, identity and why Orwell’s vision of the future is as relevant now as ever. 1984 Playhouse Theatre Limited season from 14 June – 3 Sep 2016 www.1984theplay.co.uk To enter, visit www.hotticketoffers.com/competition/1984theorwellprize and enter the code ORWELL. The competition closes on Fri 3 June at 5pm. Good luck!